Second Hurricane Ida died after man drowned in floodwaters as Louisiana hospitals reach capacity, photos reveal carnage

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A SECOND person died from Hurricane Ida after a man drowned in floodwaters in New Orleans on Monday – as hospitals reached breaking point and the extent of destruction revealed in shocking photos.

The second victim, an unnamed man, was found dead after trying to drive his car through high water, the Louisiana Department of Health said.

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Dartanian Stovall looks at the house that collapsed with him inside during the height of Hurricane Ida in New Orleans, LouisianaCredit: Reuters
A woman looks at the damage caused to a neighborhood by Hurricane Ida in Kenner, Louisiana

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A woman looks at the damage caused to a neighborhood by Hurricane Ida in Kenner, LouisianaCredit: Getty
Highway 51 floods after Hurricane Ida hit LaPlace, Louisiana

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Highway 51 floods after Hurricane Ida hit LaPlace, LouisianaCredit: Reuters
A car is seen under the rubble after a building was destroyed by Hurricane Ida

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A car is seen under the rubble after a building was destroyed by Hurricane IdaCredit: Getty
Major flaring at chemical refineries the morning after Hurricane Ida hit Norco, Louisiana on Monday

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Major flaring at chemical refineries the morning after Hurricane Ida hit Norco, Louisiana on MondayCredit: AP
People evacuated from flood waters in the wake of Hurricane Ida

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People evacuated from flood waters in the wake of Hurricane IdaCredit: AP

This comes after it was revealed that another man had died in the storm – and there were grim predictions about the death toll skyrocketing as the cleanup began and Ida, now demoted to a storm. tropical, hammers the Mississippi.

Speaking earlier on Monday, President Joe Biden said: “There has been at least one confirmed death and that number is likely to increase.

“We have a million people in Louisiana without electricity.”

Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards had earlier said he expected Ida’s death toll “to increase dramatically over the course of the day.”

He told MSNBC: “We have one confirmed death, but I don’t want to mislead anyone.

“Robust searches and rescues are underway right now, and I expect the death toll to increase dramatically over the course of the day.”

Edwards called the damage “catastrophic”.

The White House said that “more than 3,600 FEMA employees are deployed, 17 urban search and rescue teams are in place … and … hundreds of air and ground ambulances are in place.”

DANGER FOR HPITALS

Texas Governor Greg Abbott has confirmed his state will be sending “emergency resources and personnel to Louisiana to help deal with the aftermath of Hurricane Ida.”

He added, “We will never forget the kindness, generosity and support offered by Louisiana during Hurricane Harvey four years ago. When neighbors help neighbors, America is stronger.”

Governor Edwards said Sunday that Louisiana was in “a very dangerous place with our hospitals.”

In Thibodaux, some patients were ventilated by hand after the hospital’s emergency generators stopped working, Newsweek reports.

Local health trust officials said power had been restored to the generators.

Read our Storm Ida live blog for the very latest news and updates …

More than 20 nursing homes and 18 assisted living facilities were also evacuated across the state.

And, violent gusts tore the roof of the hospital of the Lady of the Sea in the parish of Lafourche.

Slates were thrown from the roof as they were picked up by winds, according to the New York Post.

Ochsner Medical Center was also affected, but no injuries were reported and there was no “major” structural damage, according to WWL-TV.

Heavy rains and fierce winds even knocked down emergency generators in some hospitals.

BUILDINGS COLLAPSE

Ida struck as intensive care units overflowed with Covid patients.

The delta variant has spread throughout the state, and Louisiana has one of the lowest vaccination rates in the United States.

There are more than 2,400 Covid patients in hospitals across the state.

Photos taken overnight show devastation in New Orleans’ French Quarter as sections of buildings were ripped off by Ida.

Louisianans were caught in torrential rains and flash floods as they tried to find a place to shelter.

Intense storm surges hit the sea walls of St. Louis Bay, Mississippi.

“WE CANNOT ALLOW OURSELVES TO LEAVE”

Some residents said they stayed in the state because they couldn’t afford a hotel room elsewhere while others couldn’t refuel their cars.

Robert Owens, 27, tried to get a payday loan but was turned down because he didn’t have enough credit history.

He told The Associated Press: “Our bank account is empty, we cannot afford to leave.”

Owens said other residents of Baton Rouge – the state capital – faced similar situations even if they wanted to protect their families.

He said, “A lot of us here in my neighborhood just have to squat and wait, not knowing how much it’s going to get worse. It’s a terrifying feeling.

“Out there people who have funds to lean on can get out of here, but there are a lot of low-income people who don’t have a savings account to fall into.”

Owens said his family would take shelter in his wife’s Toyota Avalon car if their home was destroyed.

He said: “There is a general feeling of fear of not knowing what the consequences of this will be.

“This is the most worrying thing. Like, what are we going to do if this gets really bad? Will we still be alive?

CATEGORY 4 STORM

Ida made landfall near Port Fourchon as a Category 4 hurricane, Sunday 16 years to the day after Hurricane Katrina, evoking memories of a disaster that killed more than 1,800 people in 2005 and devastated New Brunswick. -Orléans.

Governor Edwards had warned that Ida could have been one of the most severe storms to hit the state “since at least the 1850s.”

Over a million people in New Orleans were left without power.

Ida’s winds knocked down an electrical transmission tower in the Mississippi River.

HEART STROKE

The hurricane was downgraded to a tropical storm Monday morning as it headed southwest of the Mississippi.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center said Ida had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph.

It hit Louisiana with peak winds of 150 mph – a tie for the fifth strongest hurricane to ever hit the Americas.

A collapsed building in the central business district of New Orleans

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A collapsed building in the central business district of New OrleansCredit: EPA
A man looks up next to a piece of roof that ripped off a French Quarter building due to Hurricane Ida in New Orleans

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A man looks up next to a piece of roof that ripped off a French Quarter building due to Hurricane Ida in New OrleansCredit: EPA
Hurricane Ida – New Orleans is slammed and roofs are blown in Louisiana

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