Restaurants – Dining In BC http://dininginbc.com/ Mon, 16 May 2022 19:41:30 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dininginbc.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Restaurants – Dining In BC http://dininginbc.com/ 32 32 Three Wichita restaurants that have reopened after long breaks. https://dininginbc.com/three-wichita-restaurants-that-have-reopened-after-long-breaks/ Mon, 16 May 2022 19:41:30 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/three-wichita-restaurants-that-have-reopened-after-long-breaks/ Pho Cuong, a popular neighborhood restaurant at 6605 E. 37th St. North, had been closed since January but has just reopened. Wichita Eagle Dining Panel Every once in a while, a restaurant in Wichita goes into long hibernation, and fans fear the hibernation may never end. For these three restaurants, however, the long stops are […]]]>

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Pho Cuong, a popular neighborhood restaurant at 6605 E. 37th St. North, had been closed since January but has just reopened.

Wichita Eagle Dining Panel

Every once in a while, a restaurant in Wichita goes into long hibernation, and fans fear the hibernation may never end.

For these three restaurants, however, the long stops are finally over – or almost over:

Pho Cuong, 6605 E. 37th St. North: This neighborhood Vietnamese restaurant, known for its pho and spring rolls, closed in January due to a family emergency. But it finally reopened last week. Its hours of operation are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday, 9:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday, and 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday.

jacky chan
Jacky Chan Sushi returns after a hiatus of several weeks. Denise Neil The Wichita Eagle

Jacky Chan Sushi, 7820 E. Harry: Owner Binh Tran had to leave the country after a death in the family, and he closed his longtime sushi restaurant while he was gone. But he’s back now and plans to reopen the restaurant on May 27, he said. Hours will be 11 a.m. to 2 a.m.

Watermark Coffee, inside Watermark Books, 4701 E. Douglas: The popular little cafe inside Watermark has had no food service since the pandemic began. Although it offers take-out food, it finally reopened earlier this month and even expanded its outdoor patio. The cafe serves coffee, pastries, cookies, sandwiches, salads and soup. Its hours of operation are 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.

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The Watermark Cafe in Wichita has finally reopened its dining room. File photo The Wichita Eagle

Denise Neil has been covering restaurants and entertainment since 1997. Her Dining with Denise Facebook page is where diners can get local restaurant information. She is a regular judge at local cooking competitions and speaks to groups all over Wichita about the restaurant business.

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Restaurants prepare to increase business with SU and Le Moyne graduation https://dininginbc.com/restaurants-prepare-to-increase-business-with-su-and-le-moyne-graduation/ Sat, 14 May 2022 15:37:42 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/restaurants-prepare-to-increase-business-with-su-and-le-moyne-graduation/ SYRACUSE, NY (WSYR – TV) – Francesca’s Pizza and Italian Restaurant in Liverpool has plenty of experience when it comes to busy days at the restaurant. “Day to day this place is non-stop, very busy all winter long, we have a lot of business,” said Jeremy Mathers, “And obviously it picks up once the weather […]]]>

SYRACUSE, NY (WSYR – TV) – Francesca’s Pizza and Italian Restaurant in Liverpool has plenty of experience when it comes to busy days at the restaurant.

“Day to day this place is non-stop, very busy all winter long, we have a lot of business,” said Jeremy Mathers, “And obviously it picks up once the weather starts to get better. ‘better in spring and summer.’

With this coming weekend in particular, warm weather brings graduation and a serious bump in business.

“Obviously it brings a lot of restorations every day, our notice board is already full and we have taken countless people, probably more than 50 restorations for the next two days to come.”

In the past, not only the rush of people was a challenge, but also the hot weather. Mathers says they usually have to stop taking catering orders 2-3 days in advance so that everything is done in time for graduation weekend.

“Saturday and Sunday are going to be very crazy because it’s going to be over 80 degrees and food orders are going to be non-stop all day,” he said.

“Put on all the mics, takeouts and restaurants, so it’ll be tough, but we’ll get through it.”

In terms of challenges, the only one Mathers mentioned was the shortage of supply, not only in terms of personnel, but also of products.

“Obviously with the COVID pandemic and the shortages, not just with the shortages of employees, but with the food and the product, that’s the big deal.”

“Making sure everything is done in-house so that we can prepare and deliver all products on time,” he said. “That’s the biggest challenge.”

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Pasta and crudo restaurants are everywhere. This animated SF spot shows us why https://dininginbc.com/pasta-and-crudo-restaurants-are-everywhere-this-animated-sf-spot-shows-us-why/ Thu, 12 May 2022 11:03:26 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/pasta-and-crudo-restaurants-are-everywhere-this-animated-sf-spot-shows-us-why/ Recently, Toronto restaurateur Jen Agg tweeted something so succinct and deadly sharp, it was like a sashimi knife straight to the heart. She compiled a list of what “every restaurant right now” seems to have as a menu template, including roasted carrots, beet salad, crudo and “cacio e pepe (many forms)”. “Every restaurant” means your […]]]>

Recently, Toronto restaurateur Jen Agg tweeted something so succinct and deadly sharp, it was like a sashimi knife straight to the heart. She compiled a list of what “every restaurant right now” seems to have as a menu template, including roasted carrots, beet salad, crudo and “cacio e pepe (many forms)”. “Every restaurant” means your average 21st century North American culinary hangout zone, of which we certainly have a plethora in the Bay Area.

It seems like you can’t throw a golden beetroot in San Francisco without stumbling across a pasta restaurant that promises to be unlike any other pasta restaurant, and Itria is definitely one of them. Off the top of my head, I can name a handful of its sister institutions, new and not-so-new, where you can enjoy pasta and raw fish: Penny Roma, One Fish Raw Bar, Picco, Daytrip, for example. Common in Italian beach towns and popularized in the United States by Dave Pasternack at New York’s now-closed Esca, crudo has been a longtime focus of Bay Area chefs from Michael Mina to Mel Lopez de Pearl 6101. Established as a restaurant of handmade pasta and crudo specialties, Itria excels in the small niche it has carved out for itself in the culinary moment.

I’ve written a few short notes about Itria over the past year, having watched the partnership between former Al’s Place and Cotogna chef Daniel Evers and restaurateur Min Park slowly transform from an impromptu pizza delivery operation into a full-fledged pasta hotspot that it is now. From the start, Evers’ real plan was to omakasefy the pasta; to give diners the option of snacking on several types of pasta in one sitting, although gluten definitely occupies the stomach very differently than raw fish and rice.

Tuna tartare at Itria in SF


Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle

Local trout in pea vinaigrette in Itria.

Local trout in pea vinaigrette in Itria.


Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle


Top photo: Clockwise from far right: tuna tartar, casoncelli, mafaldine, panna cotta and yellowtail amberjack in saor in Itria in SF de Santiago Mejia/La Chronique

If you want to try what the restaurant does best, opt for this pasta and crudo tasting menu, which includes six courses for $85 per person.

You will have the opportunity to try several crudos and raw dishes from the restaurant at once, and that alone is worth it. (I’m including a la carte prices just for your information.) Raw fish – how hard could that be, right? But as I ate, I marveled at the intense knife work involved in these dishes.

The local trout ($13) was a portrait of spring, dressed in a shocking green candy pea dressing. Tiny rhubarb lozenges, like handkerchiefs for butterflies, added bursts of their cheerful acidity to every bite.

Another crudo worth writing about is yellowtail amberjack in saor ($13), named after the Venetian technique for preserving fish that uses vinegar, wine and wilted onions. Its sweet and sour flavors channel the irresistible power of Italian agrodolce, and the dish’s delicate strips of red onion and onion blossoms give it a curl-like feel. A historic favorite of sailors, the technique has even made its way to Japan, where it’s known as nanbanzuke – which you can loosely translate to “barbaric marinade.”

Pana cotta at Itria in SF

Pana cotta at Itria in SF


Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle

Spaghetti, smoked octopus, red onion and chilli at Itria in SF

Spaghetti, smoked octopus, red onion and chilli at Itria in SF


Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle


The pleasantly tangy creme fraiche panna cotta, top left, is a dessert that resets the palate. Spicy spaghetti, top right, is smothered in a red sauce of chili peppers and red onions and sprinkled with smoked octopus. Photos by Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle

I also strongly advise you to go for the wine pairing ($45), with selections from a compelling list curated by general manager and wine director Julie Mackay, also formerly of Al’s Place. It skews Italian, of course, and natural wine nerds will find plenty to like here.

A short list of sakes, a rare find in Italian restaurants, suits a restaurant that embraces omakase-style service. For example, the Matsuno Kotobuki Honjozo ($15 a glass), a light sake with notes of burnt caramel, is a phenomenal accompaniment to the equally prodigious Evers albacore tuna tartare ($12), the luxurious fish accented with smoked leeks. , a yolk egg and a crunchy layer of toasted hazelnuts.

The pasta menu jumps around a bit, with off-the-beaten-path shapes like the wafer-shaped cencioni and the potato-stuffed triangoli ($23), a cynical nod to chip-lovers like me. (I couldn’t resist eating it.)

But of course we have to address the cacio e pepe in the room. Evers’ rendition is technically cacio e uova ($23), the simple formula enhanced with the addition of beaten egg. The silky, creamy sauce clings to the myriad ripples of the curly mafaldine noodles, and a healthy dose of ground black pepper reminds you why this dish thrives on its quirks. There’s nowhere to hide in such a simple dish, and Evers does it well.

Wavy mafaldine noodles are smothered in a creamy sauce with a healthy dose of ground black pepper at Itria in SF

Wavy mafaldine noodles are smothered in a creamy sauce with a healthy dose of ground black pepper at Itria in SF

Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle

One important thing to note is that if you get the tasting menu, you’ll likely get off-menu items as well. Once I was delighted to receive a bowl of spicy spaghetti smothered in a red sauce of chili peppers and red onions and sprinkled with pieces of smoked octopus. It had the odd taste of pasta amatriciana, which usually includes guanciale, but was much lighter with no pork fat. It was a welcome change, considering how much pasta you can fit in your body over the course of a night.

Desserts are simple and refreshing, with the usual tasting menu being a pleasantly tangy creme fraiche panna cotta ($12). After all those carbs, the panna cotta resets the palate; not a bad way to be sent back to the hectic environment of Mission Street.

You might be wondering what about the rest of the a la carte menu? There are two family-style dishes you could share, like the double fried chicken platter ($38) topped with a tangy Italian chili sauce. In the larger cannon of fried chicken dishes, it was just fine. Fair. OKAY. And basically, a bit dry. If you’re feeling choice anxiety about it, don’t.

Same with starters. Who doesn’t love crispy pork belly ($18), especially when paired with marinated green tomatoes and musky black garlic, like here? But it’s not a smart prelude if you’re saving for pasta, so I’d skip it unless you plan to go light on the latter.

Itria's wine director, Julie Mackay, presents a bottle of wine to diners at the SF restaurant.

Itria’s wine director, Julie Mackay, presents a bottle of wine to diners at the SF restaurant.

Santiago Mejia/The Chronicle

This shotgun-style restaurant space feels like two concepts in one. At the front, a bar with high tables and soft lighting; at the back, a bright dining room with a communal wooden table in the middle. Friendly reception staff connect the spaces like trains going from station to station. Under Mackay’s direction, they make the experience jovial and informal, whether you’re just enjoying a glass of wine and spaghetti at the bar or opting for the full tasting menu.

I can’t stop thinking about Agg’s light jab at restaurant consistency (which she admitted included hers) as I write this. It’s true that in times of economic crisis, cultural expression might be less experimental and more success-oriented, because it’s just not as safe to take risks. You opt for the beet salad and the cacio e pepe because it bolsters your bottom line, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Overall, Itria is a great case study in how a place can use the familiar to create an exceptional experience. It’s all in the restaurant’s attention to detail – through the precision of its rhubarb cuts, the delicacy of its wine list and the flourishes of its pasta.

3266 24th Street, San Francisco. 415-874-9821 or www.itriasf.com

Hours: 5.30pm-9.30pm Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday; 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

Accessibility: Flat space, no steps. Good access to bar tables and seats.

Noise level: Noisy, with difficult conversation at peak times.

Meal for two, excluding drinks: $90 to $170.

What to order: Tasting menu, lemon tartare, cacio e uovo.

Meatless options: Plenty in the starter and pasta sections.

Drinks : Beer and wine.

Transportation: Short walk to 24th Street station. On lines 14, 27, 48, 49 and 67 Muni. Difficult parking in the street, but close to several public garages.

Best practices: The tasting menu, as well as the wine pairing, are great deals. Reservations recommended.



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Colorado restaurant Los Dos Potrillos struggles to make ends meet while keeping prices level for customers – CBS Denver https://dininginbc.com/colorado-restaurant-los-dos-potrillos-struggles-to-make-ends-meet-while-keeping-prices-level-for-customers-cbs-denver/ Tue, 10 May 2022 03:35:00 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/colorado-restaurant-los-dos-potrillos-struggles-to-make-ends-meet-while-keeping-prices-level-for-customers-cbs-denver/ CENTENNIAL, Colorado (CBS4) – In Los Dos Potrillos there is no shortage of delicious Mexican cuisine. (credit: CBS) “Our map is gigantic. We have about four menu pages,” said Daniel Ramirez, co-CEO of the family restaurant. Still, supply chain shortages have put some Colorado restaurants in serious trouble. Additionally, soaring food prices are impacting many […]]]>

CENTENNIAL, Colorado (CBS4) – In Los Dos Potrillos there is no shortage of delicious Mexican cuisine.

(credit: CBS)

“Our map is gigantic. We have about four menu pages,” said Daniel Ramirez, co-CEO of the family restaurant.

Still, supply chain shortages have put some Colorado restaurants in serious trouble. Additionally, soaring food prices are impacting many key ingredients.

“Chicken, of course, has gone up especially with avian flu,” Ramirez told CBS4’s Kelly Werthmann. “It’s not just inflation, but nature itself. And lawyers a few months ago. We have seen it all. We saw [costs] going up, we saw it going down.

CBS4’s Kelly Werthmann interviews Daniel Ramirez at Los Dos Potrillos. (credit: CBS)

Historic inflation puts a bitter taste in everyone’s mouth. It hit a 40-year high in March when U.S. consumer prices rose 8.5% from a year ago, according to the Labor Department. Restaurants are trying to adapt as some are whipping up different flavors or even changing their menus.

“The good thing about it is that we’re all restaurateurs,” Ramirez said. “We all have this inner driver of, ‘Hey, we’re going to find out. “”

(credit: CBS)

So far, Ramirez said his family restaurant has found ways to keep the same 4-page menu, like using a variety of food vendors to provide their authentic flavors. And, for now, he said they are not passing any increased costs on to the consumer.

“There is always this discussion to increase this or increase that,” he explained. “But, if we decide to do that, we’re not going to increase dramatically. Like a percentage or 2%.”

SECTION: Making Ends Meet

Ramirez knows, however, that not all restaurants or family businesses are so lucky.

“This is absolutely concerning for all restaurateurs. Either we have option A, which is ‘Ah man, that’s hard. It’s really difficult. Or, option B, ‘Let’s figure it out, find a way and try to make it happen,'” he said.

His advice for “getting there”? Focus on one ingredient that costs nothing: customer friendliness.

“Once they walk through the door, make them feel at home,” Ramirez said. “Make them feel welcome and everything and those sales will come.”

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5 Wilmington Restaurants You Should Try Right Now https://dininginbc.com/5-wilmington-restaurants-you-should-try-right-now/ Sun, 08 May 2022 01:30:04 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/5-wilmington-restaurants-you-should-try-right-now/ From modern Italian bistros to French bistros, where to eat the next time you visit the Bidens. Steak fries from Le Cavalier restaurant at Wilmington’s Hotel DuPont / Photograph by Neal Santos These five Wilmington restaurants will make you a real fan of Delaware cuisine. The Cavalier When Philadelphia chef/restaurateur Tyler Akin took over the […]]]>

From modern Italian bistros to French bistros, where to eat the next time you visit the Bidens.

Steak fries from Le Cavalier restaurant at Wilmington’s Hotel DuPont / Photograph by Neal Santos

These five Wilmington restaurants will make you a real fan of Delaware cuisine.

The Cavalier

When Philadelphia chef/restaurateur Tyler Akin took over the legendary Green Room restaurant at the DuPont Hotel, he transformed it into Le Cavalier, a French brasserie. High ceilings with quirky chandeliers, velvet banquettes, and marble mosaic and terrazzo flooring make this a space that invites you to linger over steak frites, French onion soup, Parisian gnocchi, and cocktails from a 13-seat bar.
42 West 11th Street, Wilmington.

The FIA

One of the restaurants that put Wilmington on the restaurant map, La Fia is this warm and welcoming bistro that every neighborhood could use. The menu leans French, with influences from around the world: Think crispy and tender duck confit with yuzu, pomegranate, sesame and miso. A fine wine list, with Old World and New World bottles, accompanies dinner here.
421 North Market Street, Wilmington.

Bardea

Now a two-time James Beard Award semi-finalist, Bardea draws diners from all over the East Coast. Come for a good pizza or a plate of pasta; stick around for chef Antimo DiMeo’s surprisingly modern Italian dishes, like burrata pop tart with fennel and sweet onion jam. By the time you read this, Bardea Steak, what the owners call a “kingdom of meat,” should be open next door.
620 North Market Street, Wilmington.

William & Merry’s house

Head just outside of Wilmington to Hockessin for artful dishes and fine dining at a quaint 100-year-old farmhouse. The House of William and Merry is named after its owners, Merry Catanuto and Bill Hoffman, professional chefs who have cooked from near and far. Seasonality guides their menu, which combines rich, rustic ingredients with modern technique to create plates that are almost too pretty to eat.
1336 Old Lancaster Pike, Hockessin.

snuff mill

You wouldn’t expect an intimate 28-seat steakhouse in a strip mall. Snuff Mill runs it with one of the area’s top chefs, Robert Lhulier, in food and wine curated by Dave Govatos, owner of the nearby bottle shop. Lhulier’s use of local ingredients, including veal, seafood, cheese and produce, is all the more reason to visit.
1601 Concord Pike, Wilmington.

Published as “Taste the First State” in the May 2022 issue of philadelphia cream magazine.


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Dinner in Boston? Here are 6 of our favorite restaurants. https://dininginbc.com/dinner-in-boston-here-are-6-of-our-favorite-restaurants/ Fri, 06 May 2022 12:02:17 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/dinner-in-boston-here-are-6-of-our-favorite-restaurants/ old favorites Anchovy This is the South End, at least as much as any stylish bistro, buggy-filled bakery or bustling new watering hole. It’s a neighborhood bar. This is a super affordable Italian restaurant. It’s a reminder of a time when the South End was more eccentric, more gay, more artier. Some regulars have frequented […]]]>

old favorites

Anchovy

This is the South End, at least as much as any stylish bistro, buggy-filled bakery or bustling new watering hole. It’s a neighborhood bar. This is a super affordable Italian restaurant. It’s a reminder of a time when the South End was more eccentric, more gay, more artier. Some regulars have frequented Anchois for decades, and patrons from all walks of life mingle here. Joke: “A drag queen, a policeman and a psychiatrist walk into a bar.” Punchline: “Were they anchovies?” Order me a strong cocktail and something covered in red garlic sauce, will you?

433 Columbus Ave, South End, Boston, 617-266-5088, www.anchoviesbar.com

A lobster roll at Belle Isle Seafood in Winthrop.Jessica Rinaldi/Globe Staff

Belle-Isle Seafood

In Winthrop, this casual, cash-and-carry restaurant/fish market is one of the best places to eat seafood near town. I often send visitors to lunch on the way out of town, one last stop before the nearby airport, so that they leave with the good taste in their mouths. Order the famous lobster roll, of course, brimming with big bites of mayonnaise-coated shank and tail. Homemade clam chowder wouldn’t hurt. And don’t miss the fried seafood platter, with haddock, shrimp, scallops, calamari and clams. Grab a cold beer and wait for your lobster-shaped buzzer to go off; if the weather is nice, eat outside, right on the water, and watch the planes fly low in the sky. (It’s a great place for kids.)

1 Main Street, Winthrop, 617-567-1619, www.belleisleseafood.net

Shojo Pig Bao (Kimchi, smoked BBQ sauce, grated cucumber, jalepeno) at Shojo.Dina Rudick/Globe Staff

Shojo

The Moy family has been preparing Chinatown for over 60 years. His China Pearl on Tyler Street is a dim sum institution. On the ground floor of the building is Shojo, another family business. This one, by 30-year-old entrepreneur Brian Moy, looks to the future. Decorated with artwork inspired by graffiti and explosive hip-hop, the restaurant serves up traditional dishes: fried eggplant bao with fermented black bean aioli and yuzu salsa, fried chicken with Hong Kong egg waffles and five-spice butter, duck fat fries topped with mapo tofu and “kimcheese”. The bar mixes amazing and original cocktails using ingredients like pandan, Sichuan peppercorns and pho spices. They alone are worth a stop.

9a Tyler Street, Chinatown, Boston, 617-482-8887, www.shojoboston.com

The chimney of The Banks Fish House.Handout

New favorites

The Banks Fish House

At the intersection of “chic Back Bay restaurant” and “New England seafood shack,” sits the Banks Fish House, which opened in July. It’s the kind of place to celebrate a family occasion, bring an out-of-town business client, or head to an upscale brunch. It is also a true celebration of regional seafood. Owner Chris Himmel, whose Himmel Hospitality Group is behind Bistro du Midi, Grill 23 and Harvest, is a seasoned restaurateur; Executive chef and partner Robert Sisca has worked at establishments like Le Bernardin in New York. They are also avid anglers who have strong ties to the likes of Skip Bennett of Island Creek Oysters, Mike Geraty of Wulf’s Fish (he and Himmel grew up fishing together in Marblehead) and Larry Trowbridge of Snappy Lobster. Come and enjoy chowder and fried whole clams, fisherman’s platters and lobster gratins. Or for the tuna tartare and vadouvan curry mussels, spaghetti with uni squid ink and salmon with pork belly, peas, fava beans and fern heads in a carbonara emulsion. Whichever mode you choose, a platter of East Coast oysters is a must.

406 Stuart Street, Back Bay, Boston, 617-399-0015, www.thebanksboston.com

No canned fish, served with bread and pickles, at Dear Annie.Staff of Pat Greenhouse/Globe

Dear Anne

For a totally different pescatarian experience, head to this Cambridge wine bar specializing in fish and vegetable dishes and natural wines. It’s a collaboration between Andrew Brady and Sara Markey of locavore Field & Vine and Lauren Friel of Rebel Rebel, the Somerville wine bar powered by intersectional feminism and a happy attitude. For anyone wondering where hospitality is going, well, Dear Annie is too – so it’s here to try and learn by doing, perhaps paving a way towards a fair industry that’s good for humans and the earth. All spiritual philosophy aside, the food and wine are the bomb. There are snacks like deviled eggs with caviar, home-preserved fish and cheese with accessories, as well as a few heartier dishes (smoked mozzarella panini with anchovies, baked polenta with spicy tomato sauce) and a pie for dessert. Mondays are pizza night (Sicilian, plus chopped salads) and Wednesdays are pasta night (one deal, plus oysters and cheese).

1741 Massachusetts Avenue, Porter Square, Cambridge, www.dearanniebar.com

The Tambo 22 team.Staff of Pat Greenhouse/Globe

Tambo 22

For 20 years, visionary chef Jose Duarte shared his love of Peruvian cuisine at Taranta, an Italo-Andean hybrid from the North End. Chelsea’s restaurant Tambo 22 is a natural next step. Opened just at the start of the pandemic, it deserves recognition, showcasing more purely Peruvian cuisine and all sorts of regional ingredients – from yellow potatoes to an agave-based liquor used in some of the cocktails. Nutritious tarwi bean is the base for a vegetarian version of ceviche, while “Better Than Buffalo” wings are made with aji amarillo and rocoto peppers. The meat mixture of the “Tamburguesa” includes alpaca and the Amazonian fish paiche is served wrapped in banana leaves. If you come on a Sunday, you can get the pan con chicharron, a sandwich/hangover cure made with pork belly, sweet potato fries and mint salsa. Pisco sours, Peruvian craft beer and chicha morada are all here, perfect for sipping on the large patio.

22 Adams Street, Chelsea, 617-466-9422, www.tambo22chelsea.com


Devra First can be contacted at devra.first@globe.com. Follow her on Twitter @devrafirst.

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7 fantastic restaurants to try in Beaumont https://dininginbc.com/7-fantastic-restaurants-to-try-in-beaumont/ Tue, 03 May 2022 23:29:55 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/7-fantastic-restaurants-to-try-in-beaumont/ Beaumont is known for being “Texas friendly, with lots of bayou fun”. For many en route to and from Houston, this southeast Texas city offers a welcome break from I-10 for great food, colorful murals, world-class art and a taste of Texas oil history. But it’s the taste of pure Texas food and Texas hospitality […]]]>

Beaumont is known for being “Texas friendly, with lots of bayou fun”. For many en route to and from Houston, this southeast Texas city offers a welcome break from I-10 for great food, colorful murals, world-class art and a taste of Texas oil history.

But it’s the taste of pure Texas food and Texas hospitality that keeps me visiting for more than a little while. Here are some of the fun places to park your cowboy boots and sit down for a while.

Breakfast options at Rao’s Bakery (Photo credit: Meryl Pearlstein)

1. Rao’s Bakery

A local bakery with a strong personality, Rao’s has been mixing southern flavors with international influences for 80 years. Come here for a morning kolache, an authentic Italian espresso and a scoop of Italian gelato. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner treats are on offer, including homemade paninis and muffins “the size of your head.” If you’re visiting during Mardi Gras season, Rao’s bakes the best King Cakes in town. Bite into the multicolored cake and see if you get the plastic baby – if you did, you’ll have to come back to throw your own Mardi Gras party. Give owner Jake Tortorice your address and credit card information, and he’ll send you a cake in your favorite flavor. Rao’s is also a family affair. During the summer, they offer their Bake Camp to prepare children to bake their own cakes and cookies.

Pro Tip: Notice the eggbeater sculpture in front of the bakery. This is part of Beaumont’s public art program. You’ll also find vibrant murals and painted Transformers all over town. All are made by local and national artists.

Crawfish at Crazy Cajun in Beaumont, Texas.
Crazy Cajun Crawfish (Photo credit: Meryl Pearlstein)

2. Crazy Cajun

You don’t want to wear white when it’s crawfish season. I don’t know anyone who goes here and doesn’t eat at least 5 pounds of these oversized, messy red shellfish. These mudbugs, as they are called, are different from others you might have tried in other states. True to their Texas heritage, they are the size of Texas. It’s a gala night where the whole family sits around a Crazy Cajun table with mountains of red on their plates in the outdoor restaurant. Music is big here, and the stage – with its bright mural of a crayfish playing an accordion by local artist Ines Alvidres – is home to bands and singers who will have you tapping away as you bust the body of the crayfish and vacuum the meat. (Yes, that’s really how it’s done.) Add blood sausage balls, shrimp stew, a frosted cup of Abita, and finish with a slice of lime pie with a shortbread crust. . The atmosphere and tastes are wildly Cajun: a perfect Beaumont meal.

Pro Tip: Don’t confuse this with Krazy Kajun. They may look the same and have similar menus, but the one with the VSs gets my vote for most fun restaurant in Beaumont. Plus, he gets daily deliveries of fresh crayfish when in season (November-July), and you definitely don’t want to miss that!

Outdoor tables at Katherine & Company in Beaumont, Texas.
Meryl Pearlstein

3. Katharine & company

Lines form here early for the creative, oversized sandwiches that Katharine & Company is known for. Housed in the Mediterranean Revival-style Mildred Building, a Texas landmark, Katherine & Company is only open for lunch. The atmosphere is very European, both in the menu and in the decoration. Homemade soups (try the fabulous tomato), starter salads, breads and desserts complete the sandwich menu. There’s a wide range to choose from, and it’s best to figure out your order before you reach the counter. Try a chicken salad sandwich with a surprise addition of red grapes, or try their house specialty – crab cake salad. You can decide that this “lunch stop” also covers you for dinner, and you can plan your next meal with their many pre-packaged items or dishes by the book.

Pro tips: Katharine & Company offers many vegetarian, low-fat, and gluten-free options. Extend your visit after lunch by shopping in the adjacent boutiques.

Offers at Tia Juanita's Fish Camp in Beaumont, Texas.
Meryl Pearlstein

4. Tia Juanita Fishing Camp

You are in the south near the gulf coast, so you should definitely visit Tia Juanita Fish Camp for some local seafood. A stop on the Cajun Trail, this local restaurant serves dishes with Mexican and Cajun accents. Toss your dinner with an okra entrée brimming with gulf shrimp and crab. Grab a frozen margarita or two and grab some blood sausage quesadillas, the epitome of fusion cuisine. Shrimp and grits, tacos, crawfish, blood sausage balls (it’s Cajun after all) and fried fish baskets – there’s just about anything you’d want to eat after a day of fishing. Today you don’t have to be a sailor to enjoy this tradition – just bring your appetite. Add some rock music and you’ve got an instant party!

5. J. Wilson’s

Neighborhood hangout, J. Wilson’s offers a relaxing evening of bourbons and beers along with a fun, made-from-scratch menu. I had to try the Man Candy simply because of its name. It turned out to be smoked pork belly mixed with habanero jelly, a rich and flavorful dish with a burst of heat. A perfect companion, the Grown Man Grilled Cheese raises the bar for the humble sandwich by blending American, smoked gouda and jack cheeses with a side of smoked tomato sauce. Taking its proximity to the coast very seriously, J. Wilson’s oyster nachos are a beauty choice: cornmeal-crusted Gulf oysters on a corn tortilla with Fresno peppers, remoulade, pesto aioli and salsa of but. You’ll have to trust me – it’s hard to go back to regular beef and cheese nachos after trying them, but they’re also on the menu, if you prefer. The starters are equally delicious. J. Wilson’s version of kidney beans and rice combines slow-cooked camellia beans and puffed rice with ham hocks and andouille sausage. The signature Burger chef adds even more “Man Candy”, with Man Candy smoked onions over smoked gouda, lettuce, tomatoes and pickles in a truly human-sized sandwich.

Pro tips: There is a rotating selection of beers. If you love bourbon, J. Wilson’s has over 25 choices. Take a seat at the bar, strike up a conversation with a local and try a flight.

Barbecue at KO Korean Grill in Beaumont, Texas.
Barbecue spread at KO Korean Grill (Photo credit: KO Korean Grill)

6. Korean KO Grill

KO Korean Grill, a family run establishment, is a visit to Korea, right in Texas. The Grill brings the best of Korean cuisine and tradition to Beaumont…with Mom at the helm. The gorgeous restaurant is modern and bright with cooking grills at your table set under silver pipes and vents. The menu is designed to be shared by couples or groups of four (or multiples thereof). You can start your feast with an assortment of fried chicken wings or seafood. Or try a house specialty, Ko-Gi messy fries topped with bulgogi (barbecue beef), spicy gochujang chili sauce, homemade aioli and green onions. Then the Korean barbecue begins. Choose a beef, pork, or seafood combo, or mix it up with all three and watch your dinner prepare in front of you. To complete the experience, an assortment of Korean kimchi adds a mix of fermented and spicy small plates. Be adventurous and try a strong bottled soju or soju cocktail. Whether you choose unflavored or flavored, Korea’s answer to sake helps tame the heat of the meal. For the perfect Instagram shot, Supamelon Bang Punch is made with soju and watermelon and served in a squeezed watermelon.

Pro tips: If you feel like it, you can try cooking the barbecue yourself. Luckily, KO Korean Grill stays open from late morning until late evening. When you’re done, walk by for a nightcap at the popular rooftop bar Pour09.

The chest stand at Buc-ees in Baymont, Texas.
The beef brisket stand at Buc-ees (Photo credit: Melody Pittman)

7. Bucces

A welcome break on the 75-mile journey from Beaumont to Houston, Buc-ees in Baytown is an institution. You may know Stuckey’s, South of the Border, or remember an old Howard Johnson, but there’s really only one Buc-ees. You can peruse their rows and rows of wares and souvenirs, and take a welcome break in the cleanest, sleekest restrooms you’ll ever see on the roadside. But Buc-ees is a must stop for their brisket sandwich, a beautifully juicy pile of beef in barbecue sauce on a lightly buttered bun. When they coined the term “melt-in-mouth,” they definitely had Buc-ees chest in mind. Don’t confuse it with their pulled pork – although it’s just as good – the brisket is the star. Around the corner from the station where the slicers in bright yellow cowboy hats are working non-stop, there are heaps of nuts, candies and other sweets to take home. If they have lime fudge, try it; it really tastes like lime pie. There’s a full range of drinks to add to your on-the-go meal. Now you can get back on the road with peace of mind.

Pro Tip: Since Buc-ees also bills itself as a truck stop, it’s a great place to refuel your car.

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Mother’s Day will be a busy day for restaurants https://dininginbc.com/mothers-day-will-be-a-busy-day-for-restaurants/ Mon, 02 May 2022 05:08:34 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/mothers-day-will-be-a-busy-day-for-restaurants/ Brunch is a traditional and popular Mother’s Day outing, and six area restaurants are listed among the nation’s top 100 restaurants for brunch by Open Table. After two straight years of pandemic food restrictions, you can expect many of your friends and neighbors to plan to dine out for Mother’s Day on Sunday, May 8. […]]]>

Brunch is a traditional and popular Mother’s Day outing, and six area restaurants are listed among the nation’s top 100 restaurants for brunch by Open Table.

After two straight years of pandemic food restrictions, you can expect many of your friends and neighbors to plan to dine out for Mother’s Day on Sunday, May 8.

Online restaurant reservation service Open Table said Mother’s Day reservations were 13% ahead of last year’s reservations and 39% ahead of Mother’s Day restaurant reservations in 2019 before the pandemic.



Open Table said its research also showed that 48% of mothers would find a restaurant meal “ideal” on Mother’s Day. No surprise to some, 58% of moms are involved in planning their own Mother’s Day activities, according to research.

Brunch is a traditional and popular Mother’s Day outing, and six area restaurants are listed among the nation’s top 100 restaurants for brunch by Open Table.

Almost all six are French restaurants, including four in DC and two in Northern Virginia.

These highly rated restaurants are:

  • The Diplomat on 14th Street in downtown DC
  • La Piquette in the Cleveland Park neighborhood of DC
  • Old Ebbitt Grill near the White House
  • and St Anselm in the Union Market area of ​​NE DC

The others are L’Auberge Chez François in Great Falls, VA, and Bistro L’Hermitage in Woodbridge, VA.

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These 20 Bay Area restaurants are among the best in the world, according to Forbes https://dininginbc.com/these-20-bay-area-restaurants-are-among-the-best-in-the-world-according-to-forbes/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 04:38:42 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/these-20-bay-area-restaurants-are-among-the-best-in-the-world-according-to-forbes/ On Tuesday, Forbes Travel Guide released its star award winners for 2022 which highlighted a slew of top Bay Area restaurants considered among the “most outstanding” businesses in the world. In its 64th annual list that honored more than 250 restaurants worldwide, 20 fine-dining Bay Area restaurants were recognized in the esteemed guide for everything […]]]>

On Tuesday, Forbes Travel Guide released its star award winners for 2022 which highlighted a slew of top Bay Area restaurants considered among the “most outstanding” businesses in the world.

In its 64th annual list that honored more than 250 restaurants worldwide, 20 fine-dining Bay Area restaurants were recognized in the esteemed guide for everything from their elegant cuisine to the beautiful ambiance of each space. Atelier Crenn, Benu and Saison were among the five-star winners in San Francisco.

“Remember that 1980s TV show ‘Fantasy Island’ where a man dressed in white granted visitors every wish? Saison is the culinary equivalent – ​​a personalized, luxurious hunter-gatherer fantasy dining experience in the SoMa district of San Francisco,” Forbes wrote of Saison.

The Saison restaurant in San Francisco was among the five-star winners of Forbes Travel Guide’s 2022 Star Awards.

Lin L. on Yelp

Beyond San Francisco, where other top destinations like Manresa in Los Gatos, Navio in Half Moon Bay as well as many others in Napa County and Sonoma, which featured Chef Thomas’ acclaimed The French Laundry Keller. Forbes also added restaurants that earned four stars and others that were in its “recommended” section. Of San Francisco’s Spruce restaurant, which was recommended, Forbes praised the moody decor and delicious bites, but added that its food and service can “suffer from inequities.”

Forbes’ list of winners comes the same week the James Beard Foundation announced its nominees for the media awards where Mister Jiu’s chef-owner Brandon Jew and co-author Tienlon Ho were shortlisted for their cookbook, ” Mister Jiu’s in Chinatown: Recipes and Stories from the Birthplace of Chinese-American Cuisine San Francisco author Kristina Cho and Oakland-based vegan chef and author Bryant Terry were also nominated for their cookbooks.

See the full list of Bay Area restaurants that landed in Forbes Travel Guide’s 2022 Star Award below. For a full list of national winners, see the Forbes Travel Guide 2022 list.


  • Crenn Workshop in San Francisco
  • Benu in San Francisco
  • Campton Place in San Francisco
  • CLOSED in Napa
  • Restaurant Farm Inn in Forestville
  • The French laundry in Napa
  • Gary Danko in San Francisco
  • Layla at MacArthur Place in Sonoma
  • Lucy Restaurant & Bar in Yountville
  • Madera in San Jose
  • Manresa to Los Gatos
  • Navio to Half Moon Bay
  • Parallel 37 in San Francisco
  • Quince in San Francisco
  • The Restaurant of the Auberge du Soleil in Rutherford
  • Meadowood restaurant in Saint Helena
  • Season in San Francisco
  • Single Thread Farms Restaurant in Healdsburg
  • Solbar in Calistoga
  • Spruce in San Francisco
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Bar Siena, Hampton Social among new restaurants that could come to O’Hare Airport – NBC Chicago https://dininginbc.com/bar-siena-hampton-social-among-new-restaurants-that-could-come-to-ohare-airport-nbc-chicago/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 03:34:11 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/bar-siena-hampton-social-among-new-restaurants-that-could-come-to-ohare-airport-nbc-chicago/ Some popular Chicago restaurants will soon arrive at O’Hare International Airport in light of a recently passed city ordinance. Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Wednesday introduced two ordinances to the City Council approving new concession agreements in O’Hare, placing new food, beverage and retail operations in Terminals 3 and 5. Here are the spots that […]]]>

Some popular Chicago restaurants will soon arrive at O’Hare International Airport in light of a recently passed city ordinance.

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot on Wednesday introduced two ordinances to the City Council approving new concession agreements in O’Hare, placing new food, beverage and retail operations in Terminals 3 and 5.

Here are the spots that could happen:

  • Butcher and the Burger: Terminal 5 East Concourse
  • Café Sparrow: West Lobby of Terminal 5
  • Boulevard and agency: hall H/K of terminal 3
  • Chi Boys: Terminal 5 East Lobby
  • Hampton Social: Terminal 5 West Concourse
  • Bar Siena: East Lobby of Terminal 5
  • FarmAir Market: West Hall of Terminal 5
  • Six Points Market: Hall 5 East of the terminal

The deal also provides self-ordering technology and delivery services that allow travelers to purchase food via their phone for delivery to the gate at Terminals 1, 2 and 3.

Grab Chicago is expected to provide inbound ordering and delivery to O’Hare, a joint
joint venture between Cursus Technologies, Inc., Hyde Park Hospitality and URW Airports,
with joint venture contractor AtYourGate, according to a statement.

“These new dealerships in O’Hare provide opportunities for small businesses on a global scale
gateway to Chicago, while offering exciting new options for travelers—
including those using the renovated Terminal 5 which will open later this year,”
said Lightfoot. “This effort will create approximately 150 new jobs and build on O’Hare’s
reputation as one of the best airports in the country.

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