Restaurant Menu – Dining In BC http://dininginbc.com/ Tue, 17 May 2022 12:06:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://dininginbc.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-1-150x150.png Restaurant Menu – Dining In BC http://dininginbc.com/ 32 32 99 Sushi Bar and Restaurant launches new “Haru” tasting menu with premium options on Bubbly https://dininginbc.com/99-sushi-bar-and-restaurant-launches-new-haru-tasting-menu-with-premium-options-on-bubbly/ Tue, 17 May 2022 11:41:43 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/99-sushi-bar-and-restaurant-launches-new-haru-tasting-menu-with-premium-options-on-bubbly/ With the temperatures rising, this season the culinary team at 99 Sushi Bar & Restaurant in Dubai and Abu Dhabi brings you a brand new “Haru” tasting menu. 99 Launches, New “Haru” Tasting Menu True to the traditions of the Land of the Rising Sun, the 12-course menu offers a vibrant, colorful and fresh palette […]]]>

With the temperatures rising, this season the culinary team at 99 Sushi Bar & Restaurant in Dubai and Abu Dhabi brings you a brand new “Haru” tasting menu.

99 Launches, New “Haru” Tasting Menu

True to the traditions of the Land of the Rising Sun, the 12-course menu offers a vibrant, colorful and fresh palette of premium dishes, highlighting the star ingredient of 99, Atlantic bluefin tuna, farmed in compliance with the regulations of the UN and FAO.

In keeping with the protocol of 99, the menu kicks off with their introduction Hosomaki, leek chu-toro, Kobe Edamame, deliciously roasted in wagyu fat and the subtle Capumiso soup, a frothy and truffled version of classic miso.

Customers will be delighted to see favorites return in this tasty collection with the 99 Katsusando, wagyu marbling 9 and the much-loved Golden Bricks, toro tartar, avocado, tobiko and golden leaves.

The foodie journey wouldn’t be complete without an exploration of 99 finest premium ingredients. From Lobster Tempura with Wasabi Mayonnaise to Panko Mistura Maki, Ebi, King Crab, Avocado and Sea Bass, Toro Flamb Nigiri with Kaluga Caviar, Langoustine Nigiri Cooked at Kobe A5 and Foie Temaki with tare sauce, guests are in for a decadent gourmet madness, indeed.

To end the feast on a sweet note, the Chefs of 99 Sushi were tempted by a light alternative with a White Chocolate and Coconut Mousse, passion heart, flambéed orange and mint sauce… and coffee or tea included, as always!

In Dubai, the price is AED 899 net per couple. With a bottle of house bubbles, the price is AED 1599 and AED 4499 for those who want to splurge on a bottle of Dom Perignon.

In Abu Dhabi, the price is AED 899 nett per couple. With a bottle of house bubbles it is priced at AED 1499 and AED 3499 for those who want to splurge on a bottle of Dom Perignon.

The Haru tasting menu is offered every day, lunch and dinner.

99 Sushi Restaurant & Bar has two beautiful locations in UAE

Four Seasons Hotel, The Galleria Al Maryah Island – Abu Dhabi
Reservations – 02 672 3333 – reservations.ad@99sushibar.com

The Address of Downtown – Downtown Dubai – Dubai
Reservations – 04 547 2241 – reservations.dubai@99sushibar.com
Instagram: @99SushiBarUAE

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This Laval restaurant has a fortune tree as grand and impressive as its tapas menu https://dininginbc.com/this-laval-restaurant-has-a-fortune-tree-as-grand-and-impressive-as-its-tapas-menu/ Sat, 14 May 2022 22:11:40 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/this-laval-restaurant-has-a-fortune-tree-as-grand-and-impressive-as-its-tapas-menu/ The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Narcity Media. Montreal restaurants certainly know what’s going on, but a quick trip over the bridge to Laval will introduce you to a whole new list of must-visit spots, including Resto Bar Gōn Būi located at […]]]>

The opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of Narcity Media.

Montreal restaurants certainly know what’s going on, but a quick trip over the bridge to Laval will introduce you to a whole new list of must-visit spots, including Resto Bar Gōn Būi located at Carrefour.

Restaurant Laval opened in December 2021 and has been a hot spot ever since!

Resto delish “is a new Chinese resto-bar inspired by lost temples in China,” as their Facebook page describes it. “We’ve created our own neo-Asian tapas dishes, inspired by tradition with a playful twist.”

Resto Bar Gōn Būi serves a stellar menu curated by Executive Chef, David Chhay, and the best part of it all is that you can enjoy their delicious dishes surrounded by the majestic Gōn Būi fortune tree located right in the center of the dining room. .

The tree of fortune in the resto-bar.mike chaer | MTLBlog

While on a date with my mum, we couldn’t help but admire the colorful and cheerful decor and ambiance, which certainly made us feel good and comfortable.

The only thing more impressive than the vibrant atmosphere was the food. With an array of dishes to choose from, you won’t feel overwhelmed by their simple, classic menu.

I went for a few of their “Night Market” dishes including their bang bang chicken, papaya salad and fried calamari.

Verdict? Absolutely succulent.

Dishes at the restaurant-bar.Dishes at the restaurant-bar.mike chaer | MTLBlog

The popcorn chicken bites were the perfect amount of crispiness and the side sauce matched perfectly.

As for the calamari, the seasoning was on point. Mixed in with a handful of grilled vegetables, the calamari offered explosive flavor in every bite and was easily my favorite dish.

Resto Bar Gōn Būi also offers a “Noodle Bar” menu with choices such as udon with duck egg batter and bacon, or Dan Dan-style noodles with beef and a poached egg. Mmm…

You also have a menu to share with ribs, Peking duck, salmon and salt cod fried rice. I had no choice but to go for the rice choice as cod is just one of my favorite fish.

The dish of rice and cod.The dish of rice and cod.mike chaer | MTLBlog

The fried rice was a perfect match, not to mention the Chinese sausage, which was really the ingredient that held the whole dish together.

While we were more than stuffed there was obviously room for dessert. We opted for the churros, but they weren’t just your typical churros.

Strawberry and whipped cream churros.mike chaer | MTLBlog

The churros were chewier and were topped with strawberries and whipped cream. Uh, yum!

The dessert had a nice crunch on the outside and a moist, steaming batter on the inside, making it the perfect dish to end our meal.

If you are looking for a place to not only soothe your stomach, but also your eyes, then Resto Bar Gōn Būi is a must visit.

Resto Bar Gōn Būi

The restaurant-bar.

The restaurant-bar.

mike chaer | MTLBlog

Price: 💸

Food: Neo-Asian tapas

Address: 2133, boul. Le Carrefour, Laval, QC

Menu

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Fairfield columnist’s new book offers full menu of past dining spots in town – The Vacaville Reporter https://dininginbc.com/fairfield-columnists-new-book-offers-full-menu-of-past-dining-spots-in-town-the-vacaville-reporter/ Fri, 13 May 2022 00:42:20 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/fairfield-columnists-new-book-offers-full-menu-of-past-dining-spots-in-town-the-vacaville-reporter/ For the second time in as many years, Daily Republic columnist, self-proclaimed Fairfield “comedian” and storyteller Tony Wade has written a book about the town’s bygone days, the most recent being “Lost Restaurants of Fairfield, California”. A sort of continuation of his debut effort, “Growing Up in Fairfield, California,” this equally light and lively read […]]]>

For the second time in as many years, Daily Republic columnist, self-proclaimed Fairfield “comedian” and storyteller Tony Wade has written a book about the town’s bygone days, the most recent being “Lost Restaurants of Fairfield, California”.

A sort of continuation of his debut effort, “Growing Up in Fairfield, California,” this equally light and lively read unfolds across 197 pages, nine chapters and an epilogue, dozens of archival black-and-white photos and images. graphics, as he serves up hearty, humorous fare at long-gone beloved dining spots, from the Firehouse Deli-Cafe to the Hi-Fi Drive-in to Dan & Ruth’s Cafe, and their sometimes colorful owners.

Published by American Palate, a division of The History Press, the book is dedicated, he noted on the page preceding the table of contents, to county restaurateurs “who over the decades have nurtured bodies, hearts and souls of generations of Fairfielders.”

In the preface, dubbed “Meals and Memory,” Wade noted that memories written in the “I Grew Up in Fairfield” Facebook group often had “many threads” that “default to food” in a town known to some. classy restaurants but mostly “good old American food.” He also included a quote from author Michael Moss’ 2021 book, “Hooked: Food, Free Will, and How the Food Giants Exploit Our Addictions,” that “most people have a food memory that helps define who they are”.

But the new book, in addition to recounting memories of “old places you could eat,” is also a catalog of untold stories about restaurant owners, including Yozo Ikenaga, who owned and operated the Mint Grill and the Park Inn and was later sent to a Japanese internment camp after the bombing of Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941 and the outbreak of World War II for the United States.

His research, Wade added in the preface, showed “how woven into the very fabric of Fairfield restaurants were and are.”

The nine chapters of the book cover the city’s first restaurants, hamburger restaurants, “classic” places, ethnic restaurants, pizzerias, “reincarnated restaurants”, some places, pastries and desserts in the city of Suisun, and one titled “Setting the Record”. Straight,” which asks questions like “Was Arnold’s Food in Fairfield the inspiration for Arnold’s ‘Happy Days’? and “Colonial cuisine or colonial cuisine?”

The photos add visual evidence and commentary on the era, much of it mid to late 20th century, naturally evoking a healthy dose of nostalgia. There’s Union Avenue in the early 1900s; the Park Inn, which later became the Black Swan and the Ranch House; the Sno-White Drive-in, later the Sno-Man Drive-in, which, as Wade wrote, “remained in the minds of many Armijo students far longer than algebra did. never did”; the exterior of the Firehouse Deli-Cafe; a portrait of Dan and Ruth Amarillas, namesakes of the Rockville Road restaurant; the hungry hunter in 1996; and Johnson’s Pastries and Cafeteria in downtown Fairfield, a mid-1960s vintage, large American sedan in the foreground.

Wade’s informal bibliography cites several books. Besides Moss, there is “The Omnivorous Mind: Our Revolving Relationship with Food” by John Allen, “The Restaurant: From Concept to Operation” by John R. Walker, as well as the websites Ancestry.com, Facebook, Newspapers.com and editions of the Daily Republic on microfilm at the Fairfield Civic Center Library.

Tony Wade’s new book, “Lost Restaurants of Fairfield, California,” has an official release date from the publisher on July 4. (Photo courtesy – American Palate, a division of The History Press)

During an interview Tuesday at the Solano County Government Center in Fairfield, where he works part-time for the Registrar of Electors during election seasons, Wade, 58 and a Portsmouth, Virginie, once again came across as cheerful, forthcoming and thoughtful as the tone of the new book and her diary column, “Back in the Day.”

A tall, thin man with a pleasant baritone voice, he said his initial idea for his second effort was a book about Vacaville, which would require “a lot of research”.

One editor instead suggested “lost restaurants,” Wade recalled, adding, “I balked at that. How interesting could that be? »

But, as it turned out, it seemed to suggest, the editor was onto something.

The new book is, fundamentally, he says, at “the intersection of meals of memories,” how when we eat, “you use all of your senses. Sometimes those memories can stay with you for the rest of your life.

The project started in November with daily writing and lasted several months. It was only “10% written”, according to information from its columns, while the first book was already “75% written” and relied primarily on previously written weekly columns.

Wade said he knew names like The Firehouse Deli-Cafe and Smorga Bob’s, but the dozens of other restaurants, cafes and eateries he had never heard of.

“I had to do a lot of research, come across some interesting information,” he said.

He spoke at length about Ikenaga, who owned The Mint Grill in Suisun City, and whose life largely ended with his arrest by the FBI and eventual internment at the Poston War Relocation Center in Yuma, Arizona, where he was tragically separated from his family, who were sent to Gila River Camp in Gila, Arizona.

“He was a respected businessman, a Japanese immigrant,” Wade said, adding that the Mint Grill later became a candy store.

In 1940, Ikenaga opened the Park Inn, which became “a huge success”, but by early 1942, just weeks after the attack on Pearl Harbor, it was already under new management, he said. .

Wade also mentioned the history of the first Baskin-Robbins to open in Fairfield, owned and operated by sisters Mary Minakata and Elsie Nakamura from 1969 to 1990. The sisters were the daughters of first-generation Japanese immigrants, or Issei, this which makes them Nisei, or second generation, Japanese-Americans.

He interviewed Elsie’s mother, Jayne Nakamura, admitting he was “hesitant to ask about Yozo Ikenaga”. It turned out that one of Ikenaga’s daughters was best friends with Jayne’s mother. So he contacted Ikenaga’s relatives in San Francisco and got a wealth of information.

“Ikenaga was highly respected in the Fairfield community,” he said. “He was in the Lion’s Club and also in photography and videography. He was demonized.

Wade said the editor limited it to 40,000 words and 100 photos, but “Lost Restaurants” came in at 48,000 words and 110 photos.

One of the “coolest things” about the journey to completing the book was discovering a restaurant called Voie, a French word meaning “here,” Wade said, smiling at the memory.

In the book, he wrote, “When many locals see the dilapidated envelope of the former Here restaurant at 1721 North Texas Street, they may find it very hard to believe that at one time it was the fanciest place in town.” It featured white tablecloths, a turquoise upholstered chair, gold-framed paintings, antique mirrors, and a dress code. Today, he writes, the space is “now a car shop”.

As he did with his first book, Wade is planning several author signing events in the coming weeks and months for “Lost Restaurants of Fairfield, California,” which sells for $21.99. Its official publisher release date is July 4th.

THE SIGNATURE CALENDAR

  • Early Bird Author Signature — 1:30-4:30 p.m., June 25, Joe’s Buffet
    834 Texas St., Fairfield.
  • Suisun City Fourth of July — 11 a.m. to 9 p.m., Harbor Square, 700 Main St., Suisun City.
  • Author Signature — 6:30-8 p.m., July 7, Fairfield Civic Center Library, 1150 Kentucky St.,
    Fairfield.
  • Author’s signature — 6:30-8 p.m., July 14, Fairfield Cordelia Library, 5050 Business Center Drive, Fairfield.
  • Author’s signature — 1:30-4:30 p.m., July 30, Dave’s Giant Hamburgers, 1055 North Texas St., Fairfield.
  • Fairfield Tomato & Vine Festival – 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Sept. 10 and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sept. 11, downtown Fairfield.
  • Waterfront Festival – 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. October 1, Harbor Square, 700 Main St., Suisun City.
  • Rancho Solano Holiday Boutique – 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Nov. 20, The Rancho Solano Clubhouse, 3250 Rancho Solano Parkway, Fairfield.
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Why virtual restaurants can’t be an afterthought | Franchise News https://dininginbc.com/why-virtual-restaurants-cant-be-an-afterthought-franchise-news/ Wed, 11 May 2022 02:59:28 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/why-virtual-restaurants-cant-be-an-afterthought-franchise-news/ Remember when Pasqually’s Pizza & Wings angered some customers after they discovered the virtual brand was actually Chuck E. Cheese in disguise? Applebee was also criticized for the Neighborhood Wings menu he rolled out on Grubhub, but that reaction is so 2020. A mode of menu and brand innovation that gained traction during the coronavirus […]]]>

Remember when Pasqually’s Pizza & Wings angered some customers after they discovered the virtual brand was actually Chuck E. Cheese in disguise? Applebee was also criticized for the Neighborhood Wings menu he rolled out on Grubhub, but that reaction is so 2020.

A mode of menu and brand innovation that gained traction during the coronavirus pandemic has since become big business for restaurants and companies creating and licensing concepts that have no physical counterparts.

“I think it’s a really interesting time right now because people are getting really comfortable and used to ordering from brands that only exist online,” said Alex Canter, CEO of the platform. -form of virtual restaurant brand Nextbite, speaking on a panel at the 2022 Food Conference on Demand. Delivery-only menus are no longer seen as “misleading or confusing” as they have become commonplace and the customer experience has improved, he continued.

Consumers “care less that it’s not brick and mortar,” Canter said, but that doesn’t mean restaurants should just redesign the menu and put it online under a different name.

Digital restaurant brands require major marketing punch to build and maintain a base customer base, said Robert Earl, co-founder of Virtual Dining Concepts. That’s why VDC has chosen to tie many of its brands to celebrities such as singer Mariah Carey and YouTube personality MrBeast. Partnerships help create “famous and successful” intellectual property assets, Earl said, and then VDC brings its restaurant-operating prowess.

Related: Is there real money in virtual restaurants?

“The reason behind it is the cost of marketing,” he said. “Having these celebrities with huge reach keeps consumers in the know about our brands.”

“It’s deceptively complicated, the amount of investment it takes to bring these concepts to market,” said Canter, who noted that he sees many big chains and franchises trying to launch their own virtual concepts but failing. to gain traction in crowded third-party markets. Nextbite helps build and roll out delivery-only brands, recently working with IHOP on the launch of its Thrilled Cheese and Super Mega Dilla, which IHOP franchisees are testing in approximately 50 restaurants.

Aaron Noveshen, CEO of fast-casual concept Starbird, and founder and president of restaurant consultancy The Culinary Edge, warned of what he called “sound marks” and said restaurants must ultimately be able to run the food. Product consistency and quality can suffer when a virtual brand is added to an existing restaurant’s operations, an increasingly common approach.






Restaurant owners must perform in the real world for a virtual brand to succeed, panelists said at the Food On Demand conference. From left to right, Nextbite’s Alex Canter, Starbird’s Aaron Noveshen and C3’s Joey Simons.


Noveshen, which is launching a franchise program for Starbird and also runs virtual brands from existing locations, said it takes a “train the trainer” approach and relies heavily on training videos to help operators to integrate new brands into the kitchen.

Joey Simons, senior vice president of operations for food technology platform C3, said the company will go so far as to license one of its digital restaurant brands – its portfolio includes Umami Burger and Krispy Rice – if there are major issues with product quality. “It’s amazing how badly you can ruin a burger,” he joked, adding that C3 will aim to retrain staff first before resorting to other measures.

Staffing, Earl noted, should be a major consideration for restaurateurs considering additional revenue through delivery-only menus. “Anyone here thinking about a virtual brand, don’t do it if it’s going to increase your work. It won’t work,” he said of the economy.

Food On Demand is a sister publication to Franchise Times. Check out more coverage from the Food On Demand conference, held May 4-6 in Las Vegas.

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Historic Montrose Boutique Hotel taps new chef for its striking restaurant – tonight and tomorrow changes the menu https://dininginbc.com/historic-montrose-boutique-hotel-taps-new-chef-for-its-striking-restaurant-tonight-and-tomorrow-changes-the-menu/ Sat, 07 May 2022 19:57:45 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/historic-montrose-boutique-hotel-taps-new-chef-for-its-striking-restaurant-tonight-and-tomorrow-changes-the-menu/ On year after owner Steve Zimmerman and his son Dan transformed their historic boutique hotel La Colombe D’Or, located in a nearly century-old Fondren mansion in Montrose, into an exciting collaboration with global real estate company Hines, which built a 34- story high-rise apartment connected to the historic property, change is in the air at […]]]>

On year after owner Steve Zimmerman and his son Dan transformed their historic boutique hotel La Colombe D’Or, located in a nearly century-old Fondren mansion in Montrose, into an exciting collaboration with global real estate company Hines, which built a 34- story high-rise apartment connected to the historic property, change is in the air at the front and back of the house restaurant. Jesus “JB” Babaran has been named Tonight & Tomorrow’s new executive chef, tasked with advancing the restaurant’s coastal European cuisine.

True to his inspiration (the famous Roux brothers’ hotel in Saint-Paul de Vence, which inspired Zimmerman decades earlier), Chef Babaran will introduce more classic French cooking techniques and flavors to his spring and winter menus. summer. He replaces Jonathan Wicks, who had been the chef since Tonight & Tomorrow opened a year ago.

“I’m thrilled to call La Colombe d’Or my new home and bring my cooking techniques to a Houston institution,” says Babaran. “As a longtime Houston resident, I understand the palate of the city and look forward to introducing exciting new flavors and ideas to our seasonal restaurant and bar menus.”

Inside the boutique hotel – which has been completely redesigned with the help of renowned design firm Rottet Studio (run by Lauren Rottet of Houston), you’ll find the Tonight & Tomorrow dining room, a separate craft cocktails dubbed Bar 3, plus five one-bedroom suites just up the spiral staircase.

Its dining rooms – which thankfully retain all the glorious original millwork – have been updated with comfortable emerald-upholstered banquettes and elegant caned-back chairs, linen-free marble table tops alternating with those lined gold and topped with a glossy black lacquer finish. Like the French original, over the years Steve Zimmerman has drawn artists to his own enclave and added works by Raoul Dufy, Arik Levy, Christian Rosa and Dorothy Hood to his enviable art collection.

Calvin Salemi and JB Babaran take over as the food and beverage team at Houston’s Tonight & Tomorrow restaurant. (Photo by Rebecca Wright)

New food and beverage director Calvin Salemi, recently transplanted from Guam via Paris, Bangkok, Tokyo and New York, oversees the service and day-to-day operation of Tonight & Tomorrow and Bar No.3. Salemi brings extensive restaurant experience in global five-star hotel environments, including Minetta Tavern in New York and Dusit Thani Resort in Guam.

Menu changes tonight and tomorrow

Look for new dishes like Cacciucco, a stew of lobster, octopus, shrimp, clams, mussels, scallops and fish simmered in a broth of red wine and tomatoes. It will share space on the menu with entrees like stir-fried Gulf red snapper topped with jumbo crab, grilled rabbit, Rohan duck, lamb shank barbacoa, ribeye and beef tenderloin.

Starters range from seared foie gras and black truffle risotto to a mix of seasonal salads. A selection of family-style sides is also available, where sharing of each dish is strongly encouraged. While longtime menu favorites, including French Onion Soup and Crab Ravigote, still retain a spot on the menu.

Bar #3 - Mountain of Light Cocktail (Photo by Rebecca Wright)
The collection of seasonal craft cocktails are named after the outdoor sculptures posed on the grounds of La Colombe d’Or, including this one called Mountain of Light. (Photo by Rebecca Wright)

Plus, an all-new drinks and bites menu debuted at Bar No.3. The collection of seasonal craft cocktails are named after the outdoor sculptures placed on the grounds of La Colombe d’Or.

“East of the Pecos,” a tequila and mezcal-based tincture, is named after artist Rolf Westphal’s yellow-painted steel cantilevered installation. ‘Rock Growth Root’, a dark rum and coffee spirit drink, takes its name from Arik Levy’s Corten steel installation found at the corner of the property at Montrose Boulevard and Harold Street.

Nine craft cocktails and a seasonal mocktail are on the spring and summer menu. A few additions to the bar’s bites menu include a duck carnitas tostada, steamed mussels and steak fries.

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Sweetgreen sees positive results from price increases in Q1 https://dininginbc.com/sweetgreen-sees-positive-results-from-price-increases-in-q1/ Fri, 06 May 2022 19:12:06 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/sweetgreen-sees-positive-results-from-price-increases-in-q1/ Sweetgreen is benefiting from price increases as the Los Angeles-based brand – which implemented a 10% price increase over the course of a year – increased same-store sales by 35% for the first quarter which ended on March 27. The fast food chain implemented a 6% increase in January 2022 and 4% in January 2021. […]]]>

Sweetgreen is benefiting from price increases as the Los Angeles-based brand – which implemented a 10% price increase over the course of a year – increased same-store sales by 35% for the first quarter which ended on March 27.

The fast food chain implemented a 6% increase in January 2022 and 4% in January 2021. However, Sweetgreen saw “virtually no inflationary pressure against the 6% price increase” during the first quarter according to Chief Financial Officer Mitch Reback.

“We have a very vegan menu and it’s a locally sourced vegan menu. And in the environment we’re in, those are two big advantages,” Reback said. “Around 88% of our feed is under contract…right now we are seeing pressure on our costs, particularly in chicken, sunflower oil and distribution. »

Sweetgreen expects sales to decline in the second quarter due to inflation, Reback warned. The company expects same-store sales increases for the rest of the year to be closer to 20% to 26%.

“The path to recovery is neither linear nor consistent; however, the strength of our brand, product, digital platform and team gives us confidence to reach our goal of 1,000 restaurants in the United States by the end of the decade. We are well equipped and steadfastly focused on building a sustainable business and on our path to profitability,” Reback said.

The new stores in Colorado and Florida have been standout performers in terms of new markets for Sweetgreen, the company said. With suburban stores outperforming city stores, 90% of the pipeline for 2022 is suburban focused.

“While our urban stores have recovered, we haven’t seen any change in our suburban stores, which is really encouraging,” Reback said.

Since the end of the fourth quarter, 90-day retention of team members has increased 10%, and by the end of the first quarter, stores were 95% staffed.

During the quarter, 66% of total revenue came from digital sales, with 43% of total revenue coming from the channel’s own digital channels.

“We want to make the Sweetgreen app the best place to order Sweetgreen,” said CEO Jonathan Neman.

The first “Sweetlane,” a Sweetgreen location with a drive-through pickup lane, will open in Schaumburg, Illinois next year. There, customers will be able to place orders in advance through the app.

“Our native delivery channel was our fastest growing channel in the quarter, outpacing third-party delivery growth,” Neman said.

It’s not the only new store prototype using digital channels. Also on Friday, Sweetgreen announced the pilot for its first pickup kitchen, in Washington, DC, where customers can pick up digital orders. The location will not have counter service or indoor catering.

” We are waiting [the Sweetlane and the pickup kitchen] to meet or exceed our return on capital,” Neman said.

The chain also added 98 new outposts, or delivery-only locations, in the first quarter, ending the quarter with 579 total outposts.

Sweetgreen is also experimenting with loyalty. After ending its loyalty app in January 2021, the chain reintroduced the app in December and piloted a program called Sweetpass in January, allowing customers to purchase a $10 pass valid for 30 days, which earns them a $3 credit on $9.95 app or website orders or Suite.

During the few weeks it was active, 16,600 passes were sold. Ninety percent of customers surveyed said they would buy the pass again. New stale and low-frequency customers accounted for 60% of Sweetpass users and records show they placed five additional orders, according to Neman.

“We believe a redesigned loyalty program that includes both subscription and personalized promotion capabilities will have a forced multiplier effect when you combine it with our healthy menu designed to be eaten every day,” he said. he declares.

Earlier this week, Sweetgreen launched a partnership with Phoenix Suns player Devin Booker. Over the next few weeks, customers will be able to find orders from Sweetgreen employees on TikTok and discover even more ways to personalize their bowls.

Sweetgreen currently has over 150 locations.

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What happened to Taco Bell in Juneau? https://dininginbc.com/what-happened-to-taco-bell-in-juneau/ Tue, 03 May 2022 22:11:16 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/what-happened-to-taco-bell-in-juneau/ Charles McKenry poses in front of the menu at Taco Bell in downtown Juneau in 1999. (Photo courtesy of Charles McKenry) https://media.ktoo.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/05/03TacoBell.mp3 In the late 90s, Juneau had two Taco Bells. But by the early 2000s, they were both gone. Juneau has a history of fast-food franchises coming and going, but the demise of the […]]]>
Charles McKenry poses in front of the menu at Taco Bell in downtown Juneau in 1999. (Photo courtesy of Charles McKenry)


In the late 90s, Juneau had two Taco Bells. But by the early 2000s, they were both gone. Juneau has a history of fast-food franchises coming and going, but the demise of the Taco Bells left plenty of rumors in its wake, ranging from “employees were selling drugs” to “wasn’t that hepatitis? “

“Every business is going to have drama and rumors and this and that,” said Jennifer Solano, who worked at Taco Bell in Juneau’s Mendenhall Valley. “To be honest, Taco Bell was a healthy good place to work. They taught me enough that I was able to raise a family and pursue my career in fast food restaurant management.

Solano now runs a subway in Anchorage, but she started working for Taco Bell in Juneau as a teenager. In the mid-90s, he sat where the Asiana Garden restaurant is now, across from Super Bear.

“We had repeated problems with the [produce] shipments,” Solano said. “We should throw away sour cream, cheeses, lettuce, tomatoes. They kept coming in frozen when they just needed to be refrigerated, and we were wasting a lot of money.

Solano eventually became assistant manager. She said getting quality products from the Lower 48 was just one of many issues.

“Everything in the building was falling apart and falling apart,” Solano said. “There were so many times the grease trap had to be redone because the pipes under all the flooring were so old and brittle they were actually collapsing.”

A small Taco Bell Express restaurant shared space with Subway in downtown Juneau before closing in 1999. (Photo courtesy of Charles McKenry)

Plumbers were called in to try and fix the problem overnight, which meant workers the next morning were walking on temporary floors.

“It’s not an overnight project,” she says. “So we tried to keep the staff minimal so that no one collided or got hurt.”

The interview turned into a cycle. A pipe would be repaired, the floor would be replaced, and another pipe would collapse elsewhere.

The Valley Taco Bell also went through several different managers. Solano said she often takes over when one of them attends meetings in Anchorage. At some point, it became a Taco Bell and Baskin Robbins combination.

“They would expect someone who makes burritos to come by and make a frappuccino,” Solano said. “You know, you have to bake ice cream cakes and you have to be able to decorate them and trying to manage a Taco Bell side and trying to bake cakes was pretty hard for me.”

Repairs became so expensive that owners began looking for a new building to move to.

“But there wasn’t a good place in Juneau 18-20 years ago to set up a fast food restaurant with drive-thru,” Solano said. “So they decided they were going to cut their losses and go ahead and close the doors.”

Some workers were not even given advance notice that the restaurant was closing. They showed up the next day to a note on the door and were told to collect their compensation checks.

The Valley location was the last Taco Bell to exist in Juneau, but at one point the city had two – there was a smaller Taco Bell Express downtown. It shared space with a subway in a building where Sealaska Heritage now stands.

In 1997, Juneau’s downtown Taco Bell won a Golden Bell award. It was named seventh in the nation for quality and service out of 1,500 franchise stores. (Photo courtesy of Charles McKenry)

Charles McKenry started there in 1987 and worked his way up to general manager.

“Taco Bell was having a competition called Golden Bell,” McKenry said. “We were able to take this store to number seven in the country for quality and service out of 1,500 franchise stores.”

But the downtown restaurant was not very profitable. It closed in the summer of 1999 when the head office decided to focus its efforts on the Valley location. McKenry was moved there as shift manager to try to improve service.

“The gentleman who ran the store insisted that no one would listen to me because it was his store and he would teach them his way, not necessarily Taco Bell’s,” McKenry said. “He didn’t care about quality or service. It all depended on his results, even if that meant not being honest about some numbers.

Eventually, McKenry quit because of this manager, but his experience wasn’t all bad.

“We had great people,” McKenry said. “It was a fantastic product. I mean I really enjoyed working for Taco Bell itself, but you can’t take that much.

Now, if you’re craving a Crunchwrap Supreme, the Lunch Crunch Wrap at Lemon Creek Breeze In is pretty similar.



Curious Juneau

Are you curious about Juneau, its history, places and people? Or if you just like asking questions, ask them!

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Rising prices mean changing Fresno restaurant menus https://dininginbc.com/rising-prices-mean-changing-fresno-restaurant-menus/ Mon, 02 May 2022 15:20:52 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/rising-prices-mean-changing-fresno-restaurant-menus/ Vino Grille & Spirits owner Chuck Van Fleet removes a table from the dining room – one of many he’s moving – so customers can spread out and practice social distancing, one of the measures that it implements for the safety of customers in this period of problems with the spread of the coronavirus. He […]]]>

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Vino Grille & Spirits owner Chuck Van Fleet removes a table from the dining room – one of many he’s moving – so customers can spread out and practice social distancing, one of the measures that it implements for the safety of customers in this period of problems with the spread of the coronavirus. He also uses a special antibacterial spray on tables, furniture and menus.

jwalker@fresnobee.com

Have you noticed restaurants adding boneless wings or chicken thighs to their menus? Or maybe your favorite avocado dish is no longer on the menu?

As the cost of food and other restaurant supplies skyrockets, restaurants in Fresno are getting creative with how they deal with the rising cost of doing business.

Part of this carries over to what you as a consumer see when dining out, especially on menus. Restaurants often don’t advertise these changes, but a keen eye can spot some.

Prices paid by restaurants have skyrocketed on everything from eggs and beef to fresh vegetables, frying oil and polystyrene take-out containers.

Several factors are to blame, including supply issues, rising wages and rising demand as the world recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. The war in Ukraine is also driving up the prices of fuel used to deliver these goods, as well as grain exported from the region.

Yes, restaurants increase the prices of starters that you order at the table. Average menu prices rose 6.9% from March 2021 to March this year – the biggest 12-month increase since 1981.

But they can’t pass on all those increases, or it would drive customers away, noted Raul Gutierrez Jr., owner of Papi’s Mex Grill and president of the Fresno chapter of the California Restaurant Association.

Instead, they find other ways to cut costs, including changing the menu or cutting staff.

Chicken wings and avocados

There was a shortage of chicken wings last year and this year. The supply was down and the traditional chicken wings with bones became very expensive.

Boneless wings, usually made from breast meat, were more affordable. Since the chickens only have two wings, but more breast meat, the greater availability has kept prices low.

So many restaurants, like Wingstop and Applebee’s, have turned to promoting boneless wings.

“A lot of restaurants have stuck with the boneless because it’s so much cheaper. You can take any part of that bird — basically dark meat and white meat — and create a boneless piece,” said Gutierrez.

The customer pays the same price, but the restaurant makes more profit with the boneless, he noted.

The owner of Pacific Fried Chicken Company, which opened in August on Butler and Chestnut avenues, has nearly removed bone-in wings from its menu.

But the price of traditional fenders has come down enough that it continues to offer both. It’s now “barely affordable” as long as its customers buy about half boneless and the other half traditional.

FRS_PacificFriedChicken2.JPG
Long Nguyen, owner of Pacific Fried Chicken, sits with a hot chicken sandwich with homemade pickles and coleslaw and a bowl of garlic and scallion rice with boneless Asian wings at his restaurant which recently opened last summer in southeast Fresno. CRAIG KOHLRUSS ckohlruss@fresnobee.com

Chicken thighs appear on menus for similar reasons. Last summer, Wingstop went so far as to launch Thighstop, a virtual brand delivering from its usual Wingstop locations focusing on chicken thighs.

Avocados are no longer on the menu at Vino Grille & Spirits in northeast Fresno.

Between rising prices and getting “terrible” overripe avocados, they decided to remove them from the turkey burger and other entrees and reprint the menu, owner Chuck Van Fleet said.

“We’ve changed the menu a little more frequently at the moment just (based on) what products we can get,” he said.

While it’s easy to swap a tenderloin for a New York steak when prices demand it, some things are harder to cut.

Lime prices have soared due to drought in Mexico, citrus disease and price gouging by Mexican drug cartels. And frying oil – used to fry everything from fries to chicken in the wrap to chicken salad – has gone from $25 to $55, a price they pay three times a week.

But Van Fleet doesn’t want to stop using fresh lime juice in its craft cocktails. And he won’t stop changing the oil in the fryer three times a week.

So some of the increased expenses will come from their profits. They will also make adjustments elsewhere, frequently tinkering and reprinting the menu.

Pacific Fried Chicken, for example, has reduced the size of its sides and switched to cheaper brands of cheese and butter that don’t affect quality.

Restaurants are constantly rotating, Gutierrez noted.

“A lot of times we try to promote other products,” he said. “If beef gets really high, we try to promote chicken and pork.”

Menu prices are on the rise

Of course, restaurants still have to pass the costs on to customers. Prices go up, often by a dollar or two per entry.

“It’s either I do this or I close my doors,” said Long Nguyen, owner of Pacific Fried Chicken.

He has already fired two employees, deciding himself to work longer at the restaurant.

“We don’t feel good about raising prices,” he said. “As restaurant managers, we want to offer good food at a really decent price. It really isn’t nice to charge $10 for a four-piece fender box.

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With the rising cost of limes and other ingredients, restaurants like Papi’s Mex Grill are making adjustments. Special Bee Grandpa’s

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Vino Grille & Spirits changes its menu as food prices rise. ryan barnes BEE SPECIAL

Fresno Bee Related Stories

Bethany Clough covers restaurants and retail for The Fresno Bee. A journalist for 20 years, she now works to answer readers’ questions about business openings, closings and other economic news. She has a journalism degree from Syracuse University and her last name is pronounced Cluff.

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Australian restaurant with bad manners on the menu goes global https://dininginbc.com/australian-restaurant-with-bad-manners-on-the-menu-goes-global/ Sat, 30 Apr 2022 10:28:09 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/australian-restaurant-with-bad-manners-on-the-menu-goes-global/ At Karen’s Diner, bad manners are on the menu and clever waiters knock tables over for customers. Their first store opened last year in Sydney to great success and their staff have gone viral online, for their rude and cheeky service. But now the Australian restaurant chain is taking over the world. At Karen’s Diner, […]]]>

At Karen’s Diner, bad manners are on the menu and clever waiters knock tables over for customers.

Their first store opened last year in Sydney to great success and their staff have gone viral online, for their rude and cheeky service.

But now the Australian restaurant chain is taking over the world.

At Karen’s Diner, bad manners are on the menu. (A current affair)

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What’s behind the name?

A Karen, by definition, is a woman who is seen as entitled, obnoxious and demanding in a public setting.

We’ve seen many examples of Karens over the past two years, but this restaurant is grabbing them by the horns and opening dozens of restaurants in Karen’s name.

A waitress lets customers tear. (A current affair)

READ MORE: Residents bleed cash as cars get stuck in stacker nine months later

A topical matter visited the newly opened Karen’s Diner in Melbourne and, as expected, received a rather unpleasant welcome.

For journalist Sam Cucchiara, waitress Kali was one of the toughest interviews of her career.

Cucchiara asked Kali a few questions, including asking her if she had always had a potty mouth.

Current Affair reporter Sam Cucchiara spoke to waitress Kali. (A current affair)

READ MORE: Revolutionary on-court win for speeding

“Yes. Next question,” she joked.

Kali said they often had people walking into the restaurant who had no idea what Karen’s Diner was, but she said she quickly put them in their place.

“I tell them to do their f—— homework,” she said.

“As for parents with young kids, ‘They f—— love it.’

While the service can be terrible, the food isn’t half bad.

The guests told A topical matter they were quite impressed with the quality of the food.

With Karen’s 60s American dinner theme – burgers, fries and chicken wings are on the menu. (A current affair)

With Karen’s 60s American Diner, burgers, fries and chicken wings are on the menu.

You might be thinking, “Poor Karens of the world”, but in the case of Karen’s Diner, anyone named Karen is treated like royalty, with Karens offering a free drink if they can prove their title.

Karen’s Diner is now set to open a host of Karen’s Diner locations around the world, including New York and London.

The Australian franchise has big plans to launch 11 restaurants in the US this year, as well as opening stores in Brisbane and the Gold Coast in just weeks.

In images, in pictures

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McDonald’s pledges to keep burgers price competitive as sales and prices rise https://dininginbc.com/mcdonalds-pledges-to-keep-burgers-price-competitive-as-sales-and-prices-rise/ Thu, 28 Apr 2022 15:30:00 +0000 https://dininginbc.com/mcdonalds-pledges-to-keep-burgers-price-competitive-as-sales-and-prices-rise/ McDonald’s Corp. must ensure its burgers and coffee don’t become too expensive for customers, its chief executive said, as restaurateurs raise menu prices to offset their own rising costs. mcdonaldsit is MCD 2.36% said Thursday its U.S. locations raised menu prices an average of 8% in the first quarter, compared to the year-ago period. Those […]]]>

McDonald’s Corp.

must ensure its burgers and coffee don’t become too expensive for customers, its chief executive said, as restaurateurs raise menu prices to offset their own rising costs.

mcdonaldsit is

MCD 2.36%

said Thursday its U.S. locations raised menu prices an average of 8% in the first quarter, compared to the year-ago period. Those increases, along with its loyalty program and menu staples, including burgers, Chicken McNuggets and poultry sandwiches, have helped McDonald’sit is

MCD 2.36%

Comparable sales in the United States rose 3.5%, the company said.

Restaurants and food companies are trying to balance rising prices to compensate for more expensive ingredients and wages against consumers’ ability and willingness to pay higher prices. US inflation hit a new four-decade high in March, driven by soaring food and energy prices, as well as supply chain constraints.

McDonald’s chief executive Chris Kempczinski said the company is focused on remaining good value for customers, especially low-income customers who are more likely to notice inflation.

“We always have to stay competitive on value,” Mr. Kempczinski said. “When we lose sight of that, there’s a long history where we kind of strayed off track.”

So far, consumers have not resisted McDonald’s menu price increases, executives said, but some diners are opting for cheaper options or ordering less food per visit. U.S. customer numbers fell about 1% in the quarter from a year ago, and store hours remain slightly below pre-pandemic levels.

Rising menu prices helped push total McDonald’s sales to $5.67 billion for the quarter ended March 31, beating analysts’ expectations polled by FactSet. Shares of McDonald’s rose 2.5% to $253.37 by late morning trading.

McDonald’s on Thursday reported quarterly earnings of $2.28 per share, after adjusting for the shutdown of its Russian market and the potential settlement of an international tax case, beating analysts’ expectations of $2.17 per share.

Drive-thru and online sales help the company’s business, and the chain said McDonald’s is now the world’s largest fast food delivery service. Delivery continues to grow in many countries despite markets reopening following Covid-19 restrictions, McDonald’s said.

The company said Thursday it expects food and other costs to rise 12% to 14% this year on an annual rate, higher than expected. Labor costs in the United States rose 10% from a year ago, reflecting the company’s decision to raise wages at its own restaurants, he said.

“Food and paper inflation has certainly increased substantially,” McDonald’s chief financial officer Kevin Ozan said on an investor call.

Airlines, gas stations and retailers use complex algorithms to adjust their prices based on costs, demand and competition. WSJ’s Charity Scott explains what dynamic pricing is and why companies are using it more often. Illustration: Adele Morgan

Restaurants have steadily raised menu prices in response to rising costs, and investors are watching for signs of consumer withdrawal. Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc.

said on Tuesday it had raised prices by more than 4% at the end of its quarter ended March 31 and may raise prices again to offset costs.

Chipotle Chief Financial Officer Jack Hartung said in an interview that consumer demand hasn’t slowed despite inflation weighing on consumers’ wallets.

McDonald’s said its same-store sales overall rose 11.8% in the quarter, compared to a year ago. Sales improved in countries including France and Germany as Covid-19 restrictions eased, while a rise in cases in China led to lower same-store sales in the quarter, the company said.

The Chicago-based burger chain reported net income of $1.1 billion for the quarter, down 28% from the year-ago period. The company said it incurred $127 million in costs in its first quarter related to the shutdown of its Russian market in response to the country’s invasion of Ukraine, with expenses stemming from the continued payment of staff salaries and unsold inventory.

McDonald’s said its Russian restaurants remain closed and it expects the military conflict to hurt the chain’s sales and profits while it continues. Additional costs total approximately $50 million per month.

McDonald’s said it temporarily closed its Russian restaurants in mid-March, while continuing to pay the 62,000 people the company employed there. The company owns and operates 84% ​​of its restaurants in Russia, with the rest run by franchisees. McDonald’s also has 108 restaurants in Ukraine, which it closed in late February, the company said.

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Write to Heather Haddon at heather.haddon@wsj.com

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